Friday, 3 September 2021

What a nice bunch of people


 

I presented myself at the Embassy where my arm was stabbed with commendable sympathy and skill by a very attractive and most professional bi-lingual Angolan nurse whose name I soon discovered, never having been able to resist chatting to anyone attractive, was Marcia, same as my partner.  Even as she clasped my upper arm with a hand soft as butter and advanced with the other bearing a needle on the dangerous end of a syringe I could not help wondering how I always seemed to meet the nicest people under the most unusual circumstances.

‘Just a small prick’ she murmured.

Whether this was a conciliatory warning or an observation was something I only afterwards briefly considered, either would have been applicable in my case.

Prior to the actual jab, I was interviewed by an evidently superior medical authority who, amongst other enquiries, appeared keen to ascertain my proclivity, if any, to spontaneous bleeding.  Only after pub fights I told him which, given my failing eyesight and aged joints, tended to occasion a greater loss of blood, my blood, than when I was younger.  He seemed quite alarmed so I assured him that at all other times I was generally quite good at hanging onto the red stuff.

Normally, one is obliged to wait fifteen minutes after the jab before continuing on one’s way for fear that one may keel over and die of shock.  Clearly, medical professionals would prefer their patients to do this in front of them rather than behind the wheel of a car doing a hundred miles an hour along an expressway.  With scant regard for their fellow citizens, these two sporting individuals seemed happy to release me back onto the streets of Luanda immediately.

I am sure, therefore, that it was only because I was ‘double jabbed’, and did not leak blood everywhere as a consequence, that I was invited to be involved in the visit of a delegation of US senators to Angola, rather than as recognition by higher authority that I possessed any useful skills.


 

It was an enormous pleasure to meet with these professionals.  The United States is a major donor to mine action initiatives and it is only fair, and highly desirable, that the key holders to US coffers come here and see for themselves the positive impact of such investment.

 

12 comments:

  1. Are those the dignitaries posing with you in the first picture. You are so "at the ready".
    Nice to see another post from you. Hope your family and friends are double jabbed, too.

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    Replies
    1. Hi Joanne,
      Yes, they are dignatories, very important ones. I am glad they came to see for themselves to what use we put the funding their country, the USA kindly donates.
      "At the ready" is relative in my case. It now takes me all night long to do what I used to do all night long.

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  2. Greetings from a "hesitant"; no not ANTI vaxxer - just hesitant. May you live.

    As to mines, I am still in recovery position having binged watched "The Night Manager" over the last two evenings flat. Rarely does a narrative leave me with such a bad aftertaste. Weapon dealings. Not that the Angel (my son) hadn't enlightened me some years ago about what REALLY goes on.

    U

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    Replies
    1. Night Manager, one of my favourites as well. So, finally, we have something in common. And there was me thinking I had offended you years ago. You would not believe what goes on.

      Tell me, did you watch 'Land of Mine'?

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  3. Good to see you are still alive after all this time ( nearly 7 months since last post!!) I had given up " clicking" on your name and only just found this.
    Any chance you could tell us how your family is? ....and some pics of your kids? How is your leg now after your traumas with it, and visit to hospital in England ? Regards to Marcia.

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    Replies
    1. Frances, the family are fine. Dominic is now 22 doing God only knows what but seems happy. Alex is proud to be a teenager, he turned 13 on 02 September, and Charlotte, Charlie, is five and an angel by any measure.
      Interesting you mention my leg. It all seemed to be going swimmingly until early last year when I played basketball with Alex and Dominic in the back garden. Sneaky, slithery little bastards they were which resulted in me slipping on top of my leg and snapping it.
      Alex just loves telling everyone he meets that I "squealed like a girl"
      It was jolly uncomfortable.

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  4. The US might have invested, but it's blokes like you who've done the actual work. Well done, Tom. I also hope you have no fallout from the jab. My very best to you and yours.

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    1. Megan!

      We have nearly 1000 dedicated professionals in Angola alone, many of them women. We do not care that the donors don't get their hands dirty, we are just grateful they appreciate the good that a signature on a funding authorisation can do.

      Delete
  5. Good to hear from you, keep up the important work.

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    1. I will, as long as there is breath in my body.

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  6. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The bloke down the pub is probably right.
      Add to Microsoft Google and any government agency you care to mention.
      That's why when I go fishing, I leave my phone at home. No point letting these bastards know where the best spots are...

      Delete

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